Ages 6-8

Can you think back to your first encounter with learning the Qur’an? I bet it was sometime in your early childhood; around three to five years old. To the average pre-schooler in the beginning stages of Islamic studies, this activity is little more than a performance to roll off weird, melodious words from their little tongues and a chance to hang out with friends at madrassah over the weekends.

My earliest recollections of an Islamic education were formed on the carpet of my father’s living room; sitting cross-legged with my younger brother across from our Ustadh and a pile of Arabic texts strewn between us. While we missed out on the lively atmosphere and mischief which are the hallmarks of learning in a big group, we weren’t spared the monotonous exercise of repeating words after him until they were sufficiently implanted in our memories, nor the sudden lash from the tasbih which hung permanently from his neck when we misbehaved. My religious tutelage slowed down to a trickle over the years with our frequent moving and an acquired dread for overzealous teachers. It wasn’t until university that I reclaimed this lost interest and continued my studies -a work in progress to date.

Our attitudes to every aspect of life is shaped by our initial experiences with them -the first impression, as we call it. This includes Islamic education in all its forms. More often than not, it is the way in which we are introduced to this as children that dictates our lifelong disposition towards it. The main objective of Rhyming Qur’an is to enable us think and ponder the Quran’s verses, understand their meanings and apply them accordingly to daily use; in an engaging format devoid of traditional rigidity.

FEATURES

Rhyming Qur’an is a series which lays the foundation to understanding the Qur’an and the context of its verses. It serves an introductory first step and places the audience in a position to appreciate the mesmerizing language of the Qur’an itself.

Ali Huda Rhyming Qur'an

Each episode presents a surah or chapter of the Qur’an in its contextualized version, with a rhyming scheme applied in the verses throughout the video. The short episodes deliver the message in a precise, comprehensible manner, which focuses more on the history behind the text.

Ali Huda Rhyming Qur'an

The verses are recited in simple English, with a unique combination of actual Quranic verses, hadeeth and cross-references. Also, the verses are colour coded, to indicate the source of the information.

Ali Huda Rhyming Qur'an

TIPS & TRICKS

• Let your child watch these episodes as they move through stages in their Qur’an recitation, so they already have a basic understanding of what they’re reading.

• Get involved researching the stories behind the revelations of these surahs, and how they guided the lives of the prophet and his companions. This way, your child can tie the verses to actual occurrences.

Ali Huda Rhyming Qur'an

Ali Huda Rhyming Qur'an

• Plan the viewing schedule to a time when your child is relaxed and less hyperactive. The show has a more solemn ambience, which requires concentration from your little one.

• Have some lyrical fun with the kids outside of the show. Have them rhyme some everyday words when trying to communicate. This is an amazing way to expand their vocabulary.

RECOMMENDATIONS

There are so many virtues of reciting and understanding the Qur’an, that parents should not neglect  this responsibility.

Rhyming Qur’an is not a substitute for encouraging children to study the Holy Book itself. Rather, the show is designed to offer young Muslims a way of accessing the Qur’an.

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About the author

Khadeejah is a lawyer turned writer who enjoys telling stories that represent the Islamic and African narrative. She lives in Nigeria, where she runs a home spa business and loves to test recipes in her spare time. You can follow her on Instagram @scarf_face_

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